News

Museum opening at historic Davison’s Mill, Stelling Minnis, 25th June, 2016

At the opening ceremony, from left: Museum stalwarts Shelagh Carter, Jeremy Speakman, Jenny Morgan, Cara Cooper, Vicki and Barrie Thwaites, the museum’s effigy of miller’s assistant Sam Harris, and Ros McCarthy DL. (c) Barry Duffield.

At the opening ceremony, from left: Museum stalwarts Shelagh Carter, Jeremy Speakman, Jenny Morgan, Cara Cooper, Vicki and Barrie Thwaites, the museum’s effigy of miller’s assistant Sam Harris, and Ros McCarthy DL. (c) Barry Duffield.

Milling and local agricultural and social life through the ages have been brought graphically to life in the newly-completed museum at the historic Davison’s Mill, Stelling Minnis, which reached its 150th anniversary this year.
Years of fund-raising and community effort was praised by Deputy Lieutenant Mrs Ros McCarthy, representing the Lord-Lieutenant, as she performed the official opening ceremony between torrential downpours on 25th June.
The museum features well-illustrated display boards, a giant pictorial map of the area featuring everything from Roman soldiers marching down the nearby Stone Street to Battle of Britain dogfights, dioramas of mills and agricultural scenes including a dramatic re-creation of the Swing Riots which started locally – and a fascinating collection of old tools and artifacts.

Windmill and Museum Trustees and supporters, many in Victorian costume, beside the 150-year-old mill after the official opening of the museum. (c)Barry Duffield.

Windmill and Museum Trustees and supporters, many in Victorian costume, beside the 150-year-old mill after the official opening of the museum. (c)Barry Duffield.

Mrs McCarthy told donors and supporters: “As a retired head teacher I cannot help but be impressed by the potential of the museum displays for helping young people understand where their food – and particularly bread – comes from.” She amused the Windmill and Museum Trustees and supporters with stories of assistant miller and lay preacher Sam Harris, with whom she had a family connection.
Money to build and fit out the museum has been raised over many years through popular windmill fetes, Sunday cream teas – and grants from a number of benefactors.
Davison’s Mill and Museum is open to the public on Sunday afternoons throughout the summer.

 

Tonbridge Web Design and SEO